The Irish Wildlife Trust runs lectures and workshops in local libraries and community centres around Ireland, teaching people about bees and what they can do to help them in their areas and in their own gardens. Tidy Towns committees have been vital in providing spaces for wildflower planting.

I want to fund these talks and I need your help to do it. Sponsor me to get the Great Yellow Bumblebee tattooed on my shoulder.

I will be paying for the tattoo and anything else connected to the fundraiser out of my own pocket so anything you donate goes straight to the cause. The first 10 people to donate over €20 will get one of these lovely Great Yellow Bumblebee pin badges from the Bumblebee Conservation Trust in the UK as a thank you from me.

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The Irish Wildlife Trust works together with the National Biodiversity Data Centre to give people resources to understand and help pollinators.

pollinators and the economy

The project delivers training on bee identification, bumblebee monitoring, and bee friendly habitat creation to community groups and members of the public; including practical outdoor sessions where participants practice skills in the field, such as bee identification and biodiversity record taking.

bees and crops

The decline of pollinating insects globally is a concern that has reached meme status but whether that’s helping or hindering the call for action is up for debate. There are many resources both scientific and darkly comical explaining just how doomed we are with pollinators.

There’s some concern that the meme of ‘save the bees’ means people forget about the other insects or birds (and sometimes bats) that are involved in pollinating our ecosystems. But as most conservation effects for pollinators happen on the habitat level, I’m not too worried.

On international scales we have treaties to buy use of particularly harmful pesticides or herbicides, like glycophates. On the national level there are biodiversity action plans or pollinators plans, and land being set aside as national parks or nature reserves. But the micro-level, your local community is just as important.

bees and landscape

I’ve wanted a bee tattoo for a long time and I love having an excuse to talk to people about pollinator conservation and the great work of the Irish Wildlife Trust. Getting a tattoo is forever (as my mother has been reminding me) and with your help the Great Yellow can be too.

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A very talented botanical artist Shevaun Doherty, who’s work is on the cover the All-Ireland Pollinator Plan, has given me permission to use her drawing of bombus distinguendus for the tattoo. Diana in the Ink Factory has agreed to do that actual tattooing on the day and you can see more her work on her Instagram.

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